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pages academy 150

The following forms are not directly related to the Pages’ Academy, but may be useful:

  • The Minor’s Consent To Participate And Hold Harmless Agreement must be signed by the parent or guardian of the minor in order for the minor to be admitted to the event – no exceptions! If you are a minor traveling to an event with someone other than your parents or guardians, get a parent or guardian to sign the waiver in advance and send it with the adult responsible for you at the event.
  • If you will be attending an event without your parent or legal guardian present, you must have an adult present who will be responsible for you, and a signed and notarized Medical Authorization Form which will give that adult the authority to seek medical treatment for you. See the Frequently Asked Questions on Medical Minor Authorizations for more information.

The following forms are for becoming a warranted Chancellor of Youth Activities

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Information for Parents

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Page classes can be run at any event or group meeting; and a private Mentor may also provide them, with the involvement of the Page’s parents. There are no core classes required within the Pages Program. Pages should receive an education that is equally focused on chivalry, arts and sciences and service.

Peers and the talented gentles of the Kingdom are encouraged to teach classes for the youths and those participating in the Pages Program. An individual that is willing to offer their time, knowledge and service by teaching the Atlantian Youth will not be turned away. Page classes need to be treated by instructors with the same vigor and commitment to learning as classes offered to their adult counter-parts. Instructors should contact the DCOY or their local Chancellor Minor prior to the class to discuss the subject(s) being offered and to receive help in determining the difficulty level and the appropriate age group for the class.

Page classes must be at least 50 minutes in length; and the instructor should provide the level of difficulty and intended age group for the class. Pages should have a parent, guardian or care provider present at the class for more difficult subject matters or classes marked above their age. It is encouraged to have the classes that are hands-on while being significant and pertinent to the Middle Ages or the Society.

Instructors must contact the DCOY with a roster of the class participants and the subject of the class taught. The DCOY will track the classes that each Page has attended.

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How to Promote the Pages' Academy Locally

  • Make yourself familiar with the materials of the Pages’ Academy and how it works.
  • Recruit kids to participate in the Pages’ Academy, but do not “pick” or “recommend” Mentors for them – let that be something the prospective Student Page and his or her parents work out, if they so chose to have a Mentor.
  • Encourage children, and parents, to look over the Pages’ Academy website.
  • Encourage Pages to formally register in the program as soon as possible.
  • You can volunteer to be a Mentor to a prospective Student and encourage other adults to get involved as a Mentor without recommending a particular prospective Student or Page to a particular adult. Remember, Mentors are not required. Remind parents and Pages of that fact.
  • Encourage adults to organize or teach special classes and activities geared towards youths ages 5-17 at local events, meetings, and demos. Remind adults that they can also support the program by acting as a Mentor.
  • Promote classes and activities at local events through the Merry Rose, local mailing lists, local newsletters, and the Acorn (in event announcements). To request that your Pages’ Academy activities be added to the Academy website, contact the Dean.
  • Work with your branch’s Minister of Arts and Sciences to encourage adults to add youth categories to competitions and displays at events and demos, and encourage youths to enter these displays and competitions.
  • Work with your branch’s Minister of Arts and Sciences to encourage adults to welcome youths and encourage youths to participate in already existing regular A&S activities like scriptoria, A&S nights, music nights, etc.
  • Remind autocrats and those in charge of tasks at events that kids can help out at events. Recruit Pages to help out at events, and work with the Pages and event staff to make sure you have good matches between youth and activity; some kids are better-suited in maturity, physical strength, and inclination to helping at troll, or with the lists as a runner, or the kitchen or to cry the camp, but these factors should be kept in mind:
    • Minors should not be placing items in or out of an oven. Minors should not handle hot dishes, soup, or dishes that easily spill and could burn them.
    • Please use caution in providing sharp knives and implements to minors.
    • Minors cannot be on a list field during a tourney, and can only help with tournament-related activities with the prior consent of the Marshal and the Minister of the Lists.
    • Minors cannot handle money.
  • Encourage people to use the Bead System, and keep spare beads for those who don’t have them. You can also give out beads to children if they do not get one from the person in charge of the area they helped in.
  • Make sure that teachers know to send in the roster of children  that participated in their class. They can give this to you to email the Dean.
  • Contact the Dean with questions about classes or administration of the program and to let them know when local students are ready to move up in rank, receive Achievement Badges, or be inducted. Again, the Students and their parents are supposed to contact the Dean, but the local officer can certainly remind and encourage them to do this.

Organizing/Teaching Classes/Activities at the Local Level

  • Ask local craftspeople, artisans, and other teachers to teach a class or lead an arts and sciences activity for kids at an event, demo, or regular A&S meeting (like music night, chorus, scriptorium, cooking guild). Be sure that you have some kids actually interested in attending first; otherwise, your teachers may become frustrated upon preparing for an activity with no participants.

    If you are unsure of the requirements for teaching classes for the Pages Academy, please contact the Dean with questions.
    Remind teachers that they should contact the Dean of the Pages Academy with a class synopsis form which describes the class and where it will be held. Also ask if they will give written permission for their handouts to be posted to the site. Have them email the Dean to get this done.
  • When organizing classes or activities for the Pages’ Academy at local events, it’s always a good idea to gear such classes and activities to be in-line with the event’s theme. It need not be straight lecture classes either. For example, the Academy itself has offered a one-hour class on serving high table and being a retainer followed by a one-hour practicum. The Academy has also offered a class on heraldry followed by a roll of arms competition-practicum. Remember that children learn best with hands-on experiences.
  • Offer classes based on what your local teacher pool is willing to teach.
  • In recruiting teachers, make sure they understand that they will be teaching kids ages 5-17, and try to arrange for another adult to be present who can return possible behavioral issues to their parents so the teacher does not have to stop teaching class to attend the issue themselves.
  • Suggest that all classes provide handouts (1-2 pages) for the students to take with them. The handouts should contain a bibliography or list of other recommended reading materials on the class subject. Also ask that the teachers send their handouts to the Dean so that they can be posted on the Academy’s website.
  • If you want some ideas for classes (and perhaps suggestions for teachers), contact your local Minister of Arts and Sciences, a local Peer of any kind, and/or the Dean.
  • Most of the Pages are interested in many of the same sorts of topics as newcomers to the SCA. Activity classes are particularly good.
  • Most of your teachers who teach adult classes could teach the same class for kids if they are willing to either take a more interactive approach (as opposed to a straight lecture), or a “let’s make it together” workshop class (a particularly good approach for A&S classes). Children learn best when taught with a hands-on approach!
  • Consider starting by organizing no more than two hours of classes at an event or collegium. Please keep in mind the attention span of a child is more limited than an adult’s, between 30 minutes to one hour or more.

Promoting Classes, Activities, and Service Opportunities for Pages at Local Events

  • Email the Dean with a class or activity lists and descriptions, so that the information can be posted on the Pages’ Academy Calendar. Also include the handout with consent to publish on the Pages’ site, if they so wish.
  • Advertise the classes on the Merry Rose and local mailing lists.
  • Put information about upcoming activities in local newsletters. Make sure that event autocrats include information about youth activities in event announcements.

Organize Opportunities for Service for Pages

  • Offer opportunities to work with adults to help with the list as a runner (although minors may not work on the fighting field, and may not water-bear), serving, cry the camp, etc., assuming that the adult event staff is willing to have the youths as volunteers.
  • Be sure to communicate to the Pages that you are willing to offer them opportunities to help. But before you do, you need to talk to the event organizers who might be able to use the help of children and clear with them that they will have tasks for youths (ages 5-17). They need to understand that youths need to work at least one hour on a particular activity and that they should not consider having the youth for more than a total of two hours. In some cases, a youthful volunteer may choose to stay longer, but the event staff needs to be mindful of the volunteer’s abilities.
  • Remind the adult supervisor that he or she should award the child with a bead representing what they have done (Red for Chivalry, Yellow for arts and sciences, and Green for service). Also remind them to remind the youth to email the Dean and inform them of what they did at an event so credit can be given.
  • It is a good idea to assign an adult to be the “Youth Help Coordinator” (Youth Steward) for an event, so that they can oversee the various activities of our youthful volunteers and make sure that these activities are age appropriate.
  • Youths should not be carrying soup or other boiling liquids to tables, but they can serve bread, or pitchers of cold drinks, for example. Be aware that youths who are serving tables may need to make more trips than an adult, because serving trays can be too big or heavy. Ideally, youthful servers should be placed in pairs or teamed up with an experienced adult when they do table service. Tailor the use of knives to the maturity level of the Page, but they can always peel vegetables or arrange platters, or could help in pre-cooking meetings.
  • Youths who help at troll should not handle money, though they can check names off of lists or hand out on-board tokens and, if trained, can oversee seating plans.
  • Youths ages 14 and up can be helpers at Children’s Corners at SCA events, but must be supervised by the adult Children’s Corner Coordinator.
  • Use your common sense in dealing with youthful volunteers and be considerate that their enthusiasm to help may sometimes exceed their stamina. Please make sure they do take breaks to drink and eat, or generally sit down at regular intervals.
  • Younger children (under 9 years old) can help too, but you need to obtain the permission of their parents first, and these children should only be doing activities with their parents’ active participation and supervision.
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Service Activities

Children should be encouraged and allowed to participate in age-appropriate service activities. These activities can include, but are not limited to: handing out tokens, assisting Royal Retainers, water bearing and volunteering as list runners, running errands, helping clean up trash, servers and kitchen help are some activities that minors, depending on age and maturity, can do. There is something that any youth between 5-17 years of age can do to help out and in service. Adults running these and other activities should welcome youth in to these activities as long as the minor can follow safety and behavior guidelines.

As part of the Atlantian Pages’ Academy recognition program, young SCAdians (ages 5-17) are encouraged to do service work for the Society. Here are some suggestions on activities they could do to help you with your event, with the cooperation (and supervision) of adult volunteers on your event staff. Remember, the ages vary, so make the tasks age-appropriate!

Students receive a credit for each fifty-minute block of time they spent working. (Pages generally wear a blue baldric.) Please avoid overwhelming kids with lots of work. While they are enthusiastic volunteers, they need a break! We recommend that you only let them volunteer for two hours worth of work in a row, and then let them take a break to enjoy the event. Younger children will need smaller lengths of time, and are recommended to work one hour shifts at a time, with plenty of breaks. If you have additional recommendations for opportunities for kids to help at SCA events, please contact the Dean.

Pre-Event Tasks

  • Make signs or decorations
  • Make site tokens
  • Stuff envelopes for event announcements sent to other groups
  • Design, fold, and/or assemble event maps, programs, or feast menus

At the Event

  • Event set-up (including setting up the fighting field, etc.) and hall decoration
  • Post signs on site
  • Help at a newcomers’ information table, a heraldic consult table, the Arts & Sciences displays or competitions, the Minister of the Lists’ table, merchant’s coordinator, or fundraiser activities. Communicate with the event staff running these activities to make sure that the staff is willing to accept the child’s help, and that they understand that the child should not be responsible for handling money. Children can help set up and clean up these areas, greet those who require services, distribute blank forms and pens, etc.
  • Fill water for Waterbearers’ stand, and assist with waterbearing except for on the fighting field
  • Check that the site’s bathrooms have sufficient toilet paper, paper towels, and soap, and take out trash from bathrooms
  • Help run errands on site, take messages to other event staff, or make announcements
  • Distribute site maps and schedules
  • Pick up litter during the day
  • Attend the Baron and/or Baroness or visiting Royalty as a page
  • Be a feast-server, and/or go around the hall and pour water or lemonade, serve bread, take used platters and bowls to the kitchen (kids should be grouped in pairs so they can more easily handle heavier items, but kids should not handle any hot liquids, hot sauces, soups or extremely heavy items. Kids should not serve high table unless they have been trained in such service and must first receive the permission of the High Table Coordinator)
  • Help with formal High Table service (such as hand-washing, etc.)
  • Site clean-up

At Troll

While minors cannot handle money (and cannot be collecting site fees), there are things they can do:

  • Help set up Troll area
  • Greet people arriving to check in, and direct them to the proper Troll area for pre-registration or on-site registration
  • Hand out site tokens
  • Check in pre-registered event attendees
  • File and organize waivers and other event-related paperwork
  • Help people sign up for spaces at feast-tables
  • Help provide information (such as directing people to changing areas and meeting rooms)
  • Help clean up Troll area
  • Run errands and take messages to other event staff for Troll

At Children’s Corner

Volunteers above the age of 14 may be counted as your official helpers for the Children’s Corner, but younger volunteers can help out too.

  • Help set up Children’s Corner
  • Help parents/guardians sign their children in or out
  • Be a “teacher’s aide” for crafts, games, or other activities
  • Accompany younger children on bathroom runs (remember that no adult or older teen can ever be alone with a single child, so bathroom runs if you do them need to have either two adults and one child, or two children and one adult, or everyone will need to go)
  • Help clean up Children’s Corner

In the Feast-Kitchen

We ask that you remember that younger children aren’t as skilled with knives, ovens, stove burners, etc. We ask that you do not let a child under the age of 13 handle knives or hot items without permission from their parents.

  • Wash and peel vegetables
  • Mix flavored butters (honey butter or herb butter)
  • Make lemonade, iced tea, or other non-alcoholic beverages
  • Arrange platters of food
  • Take messages to the Head Server, Herald, Troll, Autocrat, Head Table Server, etc.
  • Wash dishes, platters, cooking utensils, etc.
  • Take out the trash
  • Chopping vegetables (if the child is over 12 and with permission of the parent)
  • Slicing bread (if the child is over 12 and with permission of the parent)
  • Being a schedule minder for the cook (remind the cook that announcements need to be made for start and stop times of feast, scheduled tasks or removes for the feast)
  • Filling water jugs for the feast hall and bring to the feast hall
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Page classes can be run at any event or group meeting; and a private Mentor may also provide them, with the involvement of the Page’s parents. There are no core classes required within the Pages Program. Pages should receive an education that is equally focused on chivalry, arts and sciences and service.

Peers and the talented gentles of the Kingdom are encouraged to teach classes for the youths and those participating in the Pages Program. An individual that is willing to offer their time, knowledge and service by teaching the Atlantian Youth will not be turned away. Page classes need to be treated by instructors with the same vigor and commitment to learning as classes offered to their adult counter-parts. Instructors should contact the DCOY or their local Chancellor Minor prior to the class to discuss the subject(s) being offered and to receive help in determining the difficulty level and the appropriate age group for the class.

Page classes must be at least 50 minutes in length; and the instructor should provide the level of difficulty and intended age group for the class. Pages should have a parent, guardian or care provider present at the class for more difficult subject matters or classes marked above their age. It is encouraged to have the classes that are hands-on while being significant and pertinent to the Middle Ages or the Society.

Instructors must contact the DCOY with a roster of the class participants and the subject of the class taught. The DCOY will track the classes that each Page has attended.

Advice for Teachers

For those considering teaching Pages’ Classes, here is some helpful advice to keep in mind. Please remember, you don’t have to stick to just these suggestions!

General Points about the Pages’ Academy

  • The Pages’ Academy is for youths ages 5-17. The Youth program also offers kids activities for any youth who wishes to participate.
  • Pages’ classes can be taught at any sanctioned SCA event. The only thing that the Academy asks is that the teacher informs the Dean of the Academy with enough time to post the event on the calendar so that all Pages know of the upcoming class.
  • Youths attending Pages School classes need not be part of the Academy but should be at least 5 years old. It is preferred that an adult attend the class with the younger Pages to help keep them focus and so they do not disrupt the class.

Advice for Teachers of Arts and Sciences Classes and Activities

  • What is the art or science?
  • What did they do in period? When, where, and who would be doing this?
  • How do we recreate this art in the SCA? What we do the same, and what different, and why?
  • How do we know what they did in period? (This touches on documentation.)
  • How can the Pages do research on this subject area?
  • If original source materials are available, it would be useful if they could be published in a handout for the students.
  • Spend some time doing the art/science together. For example, it would be good, during a class on music, to spend some time working on a round or trying instruments; during a class on poetry, the teacher and students should work on writing a poem together; etc.
  • How and why did the teacher got interested in this art/science? Explaining how you became interested in this topic can be a good way to express and share your enthusiasm for this art or science.
  • Provide some tools or materials so they can continue to do this art after the class, or a list of tools and sources so they can obtain them at a later date. For example, a beginners’ scribal class charged a $5 fee, but gave each student a beginning scribal kit to use in the class and afterwards.
  • Teachers should refrain from stressing getting awards for the art or science, since the Pages are encouraged to study the arts and sciences for their own sake.
  • A bibliography should be provided to the students, so they can continue research on their own.
  • Remember: The class is taught much like an adult class. The people involved are just smaller, and may need to have the class simplified. You can use your adult class outline. Just make is for younger minds!

Advice for Teachers of History and Chivalry Classes and Activities

  • What is the topic? Please gear the class to what children, teenagers, families, or young people would have done prior to the 17th century.
  • What did they do in period? When, where, and who would be doing this?
  • Do we recreate this activity in the SCA? If so, what do we do the same, and what do we do that is different, and why? (For example, a class taught by Dame Hróðný discussed apprenticeship during the Elizabethan era, and how it is different from SCA apprenticeship.)
  • How do we know what they did in period? (This touches on documentation.)
  • How can the Pages do research on this subject area?
  • If original source materials are available, it would be useful if they could be published in a handout for the students.
  • How and why did the teacher got interested in this aspect of the SCA? Explaining how you became interested in this topic can be a good way to express and share your enthusiasm for the subject matter.
  • A bibliography should be provided to the students, so they can continue research on their own.
  • Slides, videotapes, “show and tell,” and other visual/tactile aids may be helpful in teaching your class and maintaining students’ interest.
  • Youth fighting does count for this credit in the Pages’ Academy. While doing youth fighting practices, please remember to teach, and tell why we do what we do in every teachable moment. Please try and keep a list of those who attend practice and tourneys so that the Pages involved can get their credit.

Advice for Teachers of Service Classes and Activities

Teachers of service classes should:

  • Identify the service
  • Describe the service’s value to the SCA (to the event, local group, etc).
  • Describe good service and bad service in this area, and why there is distinction. For example, if a Page offers to help in the kitchen, he needs to listen to the head cook because of safety issues, and because he might interfere with others’ projects. Pages need to follow through on the tasks assigned to them if they volunteer, since someone is now counting on them, and if they do not do it, someone else will get pulled from what they were doing to cover; this could make the feast late, burnt, drop making a course or make others stay later than they originally planned.
  • What did they do in period? When, where, and who would be doing this?
  • How do we recreate this service in the SCA? (What we do the same, and what different, and why?)
  • How do we know what they did in period? (This touches on documentation.)
  • How can the Pages do research on this subject area?
  • If original source materials are available, it would be useful if they could be published in a handout for the students.
  • Spend some time working on this sort of service project together; for example, practice high table service.
  • How and why did the teacher get interested in this service area? Explaining how you became interested in this topic can be a good way to express and share your enthusiasm.
  • As the teacher, provide some tools, or a list of tools, and sources so that the page can continue to do this service after the class. (A bibliography and a service “dos and don’ts” cheat sheet can be helpful.)
  • Teachers should refrain from stressing getting awards for the service projects, since the Pages are encouraged to volunteer to serve of their own volition, not just to get an award.
  • Contact the Dean if you have questions, or if you’ve got additional suggestions.

End FAQ

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The Atlantian Book of Policy (Updated - 2017-02-01)
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