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pages academy 150

Page classes can be run at any event or group meeting; and a private Mentor may also provide them, with the involvement of the Page’s parents. There are no core classes required within the Pages Program. Pages should receive an education that is equally focused on chivalry, arts and sciences and service.

Peers and the talented gentles of the Kingdom are encouraged to teach classes for the youths and those participating in the Pages Program. An individual that is willing to offer their time, knowledge and service by teaching the Atlantian Youth will not be turned away. Page classes need to be treated by instructors with the same vigor and commitment to learning as classes offered to their adult counter-parts. Instructors should contact the DCOY or their local Chancellor Minor prior to the class to discuss the subject(s) being offered and to receive help in determining the difficulty level and the appropriate age group for the class.

Page classes must be at least 50 minutes in length; and the instructor should provide the level of difficulty and intended age group for the class. Pages should have a parent, guardian or care provider present at the class for more difficult subject matters or classes marked above their age. It is encouraged to have the classes that are hands-on while being significant and pertinent to the Middle Ages or the Society.

Instructors must contact the DCOY with a roster of the class participants and the subject of the class taught. The DCOY will track the classes that each Page has attended.

Advice for Teachers

For those considering teaching Pages’ Classes, here is some helpful advice to keep in mind. Please remember, you don’t have to stick to just these suggestions!

General Points about the Pages’ Academy

  • The Pages’ Academy is for youths ages 5-17. The Youth program also offers kids activities for any youth who wishes to participate.
  • Pages’ classes can be taught at any sanctioned SCA event. The only thing that the Academy asks is that the teacher informs the Dean of the Academy with enough time to post the event on the calendar so that all Pages know of the upcoming class.
  • Youths attending Pages School classes need not be part of the Academy but should be at least 5 years old. It is preferred that an adult attend the class with the younger Pages to help keep them focus and so they do not disrupt the class.

Advice for Teachers of Arts and Sciences Classes and Activities

  • What is the art or science?
  • What did they do in period? When, where, and who would be doing this?
  • How do we recreate this art in the SCA? What we do the same, and what different, and why?
  • How do we know what they did in period? (This touches on documentation.)
  • How can the Pages do research on this subject area?
  • If original source materials are available, it would be useful if they could be published in a handout for the students.
  • Spend some time doing the art/science together. For example, it would be good, during a class on music, to spend some time working on a round or trying instruments; during a class on poetry, the teacher and students should work on writing a poem together; etc.
  • How and why did the teacher got interested in this art/science? Explaining how you became interested in this topic can be a good way to express and share your enthusiasm for this art or science.
  • Provide some tools or materials so they can continue to do this art after the class, or a list of tools and sources so they can obtain them at a later date. For example, a beginners’ scribal class charged a $5 fee, but gave each student a beginning scribal kit to use in the class and afterwards.
  • Teachers should refrain from stressing getting awards for the art or science, since the Pages are encouraged to study the arts and sciences for their own sake.
  • A bibliography should be provided to the students, so they can continue research on their own.
  • Remember: The class is taught much like an adult class. The people involved are just smaller, and may need to have the class simplified. You can use your adult class outline. Just make is for younger minds!

Advice for Teachers of History and Chivalry Classes and Activities

  • What is the topic? Please gear the class to what children, teenagers, families, or young people would have done prior to the 17th century.
  • What did they do in period? When, where, and who would be doing this?
  • Do we recreate this activity in the SCA? If so, what do we do the same, and what do we do that is different, and why? (For example, a class taught by Dame Hróðný discussed apprenticeship during the Elizabethan era, and how it is different from SCA apprenticeship.)
  • How do we know what they did in period? (This touches on documentation.)
  • How can the Pages do research on this subject area?
  • If original source materials are available, it would be useful if they could be published in a handout for the students.
  • How and why did the teacher got interested in this aspect of the SCA? Explaining how you became interested in this topic can be a good way to express and share your enthusiasm for the subject matter.
  • A bibliography should be provided to the students, so they can continue research on their own.
  • Slides, videotapes, “show and tell,” and other visual/tactile aids may be helpful in teaching your class and maintaining students’ interest.
  • Youth fighting does count for this credit in the Pages’ Academy. While doing youth fighting practices, please remember to teach, and tell why we do what we do in every teachable moment. Please try and keep a list of those who attend practice and tourneys so that the Pages involved can get their credit.

Advice for Teachers of Service Classes and Activities

Teachers of service classes should:

  • Identify the service
  • Describe the service’s value to the SCA (to the event, local group, etc).
  • Describe good service and bad service in this area, and why there is distinction. For example, if a Page offers to help in the kitchen, he needs to listen to the head cook because of safety issues, and because he might interfere with others’ projects. Pages need to follow through on the tasks assigned to them if they volunteer, since someone is now counting on them, and if they do not do it, someone else will get pulled from what they were doing to cover; this could make the feast late, burnt, drop making a course or make others stay later than they originally planned.
  • What did they do in period? When, where, and who would be doing this?
  • How do we recreate this service in the SCA? (What we do the same, and what different, and why?)
  • How do we know what they did in period? (This touches on documentation.)
  • How can the Pages do research on this subject area?
  • If original source materials are available, it would be useful if they could be published in a handout for the students.
  • Spend some time working on this sort of service project together; for example, practice high table service.
  • How and why did the teacher get interested in this service area? Explaining how you became interested in this topic can be a good way to express and share your enthusiasm.
  • As the teacher, provide some tools, or a list of tools, and sources so that the page can continue to do this service after the class. (A bibliography and a service “dos and don’ts” cheat sheet can be helpful.)
  • Teachers should refrain from stressing getting awards for the service projects, since the Pages are encouraged to volunteer to serve of their own volition, not just to get an award.
  • Contact the Dean if you have questions, or if you’ve got additional suggestions.

End FAQ

Date Thursday, 02 July 2015 13:07 File Size 72.86 KB Download 1,006
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